Posts Tagged ‘Professor Thomas O’Loughlin’

At the table of the Lord

Thursday, September 23rd, 2021
table of the lord

The great Jesuit philosopher and theologian Bernard Lonergan once described those nostalgic for the pre-1970 liturgy as a group “that is determined to live in a world that no longer exists”. The phrase came back to me recently when I read of another Jesuit, Pope Francis, who spoke about finding “new languages for handing on Read more

Giving or Sharing? How we think about the Eucharist

Thursday, September 16th, 2021
Tom O'Loughlin

In everyday life, our experience tells us – unconsciously – when it is appropriate to use the verb ‘to give’ and when it is appropriate to use ‘to share.’ So we might ask someone to ‘please give me that book lying there’ or ‘I gave him the money’ or ‘she should give that form to Read more

The meal of memories: common action, ecclesial worship

Thursday, August 26th, 2021
eucharist meal of memories

In recent debates a serious misunderstanding of Christian practice is often put forward by those who seek to defend the so-called ‘Tridentine Rite’ which has the effect of juxtaposing a ‘meal’ and a ‘sacrifice.’ These objectors completely ignore not only the fact that within our deep tradition – much older than the time of Jesus Read more

Embrace Synodality or become an ecclesial museum

Thursday, July 29th, 2021
Tom O'Loughlin

A Synodal Church is not just another idea, it is ‘the’ idea, Thomas O’Loughlin, Professor Emeritus at the University of Nottingham told CathNews. “If we fail to embrace this challenge we shall have little to offer and shall become an irrelevant religious sect with massive museums and a complex back story.” Pope Francis has said Read more

The minefield of synodality: does hearing mean listening?

Monday, July 26th, 2021
hearing mean listening

“The path of synodality is the path that God expects from the Church of the third millennium,” Pope Francis has said. And so it is not surprising that in region after region Catholic bishops are embracing synodality. The Germans have embarked on a synodal path, the Australians a plenary council, the Irish a synod … Read more

Our dinner tables: the Christian new normal

Monday, June 28th, 2021
hearing mean listening

In rich countries, the virus is retreating before the vaccines: Deo gratias. In some places parish life – and celebrations in church buildings are returning to a kind of normality. Many, especially presbyters, are pleased: the familiar is returning. But we settle back into our familiar ways, we should take stock. A new normal might Read more

Spiritus Domini; an acolyte! Who cares anyway?

Thursday, June 17th, 2021
hearing mean listening

Reactions to Pope Francis’s decree Spiritus Domini have not been explosive. Indeed, the reverse is the case: bishops and presbyters around the world have said that it is merely a matter of words. After all, women have been reading for years at the liturgy – so calling them ‘lectors’ is just a needless formality! Women have Read more

We don’t need women deacons

Monday, May 31st, 2021
Women deacons

Women deacons are in effect working well in the Church, except we do not call them deacons, and they are not ordained. This is the view of Dr Joe Grayland, theologian, author and parish priest of three parishes in Palmerston North, New Zealand. He questions whether we need another form of the clergy. Grayland made Read more

A synodal Church: the diversifying Spirit

Monday, May 24th, 2021

When we mention the Spirit work in the creation we think his bringing unity, drawing together, and reconciliation: the Spirit is unifying. Any such stress carries with it twin dangers. First, that we then assume that somehow that is all the Spirit does, the Spirit is there – almost functionally – to produce unity and Read more

A new Lectionary: more than one translation!

Thursday, May 13th, 2021
table of the lord

The Tablet reported last week that the New Zealand bishops are now – like so many other English-language episcopal conferences – thinking about a new translation of the scriptures for use in the liturgy. This is a process that is commonly, but inaccurately, referred to as having ‘a new lectionary.’ In this debate, there will Read more